Founded in September 1992, Omni-Lite has quickly grown to become one of the world's leading developers of precision components utilizing advanced composite materials and computer-controlled cold forging techniques. Omni-Lite’s early success came from the sports and recreation industry where it's ultra light-weight ceramic composite track spikes quickly became the industry standard used by most of the world’s elite athletes. The company has since broadened its product offerings to include products for the automotive, commercial, aerospace, and military markets. The company’s products are utilized by some of the world’s largest corporations, such as Daimler-Chrysler, General Motors, Ford, Mazda, Nike, Adidas, Reebok, as well as the U.S. Army, NATO, and the U.S. Special Forces. The company's patented products are now sold in the aftermarket in 140 countries worldwide.

One of Omni-Lite's
State-of-the-Art
Cold Forging Systems

Cold forging involves the use of highly sophisticated computer-controlled machines that forge metal parts from round wire feedstock using exceptionally high pressure. The results are a very precise end product (tolerances of 0.0005 inches), virtually no raw material wastage, and high volume production capability.


Internal Components of One of Omni-Lite's Cold Forging Systems

Up to 300 parts can be produced in one minute. As a result of the highly automated nature of the company's manufacturing process, Omni-Lite is able to generate revenue, cash flow, and earnings per employee that are more than 20 times the national average for industrial technology companies.

Omni-Lite’s revenues have increased significantly over the past several years, rising from less than US$400,000 in 1996 to over US$1.8 million in 2000. The company has been profitable each year since 1995. The company’s long-term strategy for growth includes further research and development of new products and materials, expansion into a new advanced production facility, and the formalization of a sales team to target new customers.



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